1. irelandseyeonmyth:

    goddessawakens:

    irelandseyeonmyth:

    The Cailleach might originate as an Ancient Mother Earth Goddess.

    In the late medieval and contemporary folklore she is an ancient but ageless creature that personifies the supernaturals affect on the fertility of the land that often runs around in the form of a Hare.



    The hare is a symbol of fertility and prophecy, it even replaces the man on the moon in traditional irish culture. Like the hare the Cailleach has children everywhere and she is a source of knowlege because shes been around so long she knows everything. Ive never heard the moon called the cailleach but theres probably a link in both their functions.

    The Cailleach isnt just fertile she is super strong, she creates geographical features purely by heaving earth around or throwing huge boulders and everything enigmatic in the landscape is built by her. Round towers, passage tombs and dolmens for example.

    Carlingford in County Louth is a Norse Gael place name meaning the inlet/Fjord of the Hag. But what its really interesting about it beyond the ethnic diversity is it describes the Cailleachs one flaw. She has to head into the water at places like Carlingford once every hundred years to renew her youth.

    Unfortunately one day a mortal man interferes with her getting to the sea to renew herself because he wont look away to save her modesty while she runs into the sea naked and she dies. Stories like that might be about the conquering of feminine divinity in a male world or be about conquering the fertility of the land by agriculture.

    http://aclockworkireland.blogspot.ie/

    That story about the man is about the rise of the patriarchy, and it’s bullshit. I’ve been to Carlingford, stood on top of a frozen Slieve Foy during a 70km gale, and she laughed at me. I felt the wind blow even harder from nowhere on a sunny day at Loughcrew, by myself but very much not alone. The Cailleach still lives.

    \m/

    Reblogged from: irelandseyeonmyth
  2. Reblogged from: not-a-second-choice
  3. Who Is The Mysterious 'Woman in Black' In This Photograph?

    witchyscrafts:

    beforeitsnewsmain:

    Over the past week, residents throughout East Tennessee have reported seeing a woman dressed in a black shroud wandering the highways and roads. On Saturday, sightings were reported in Rhea County, leading many to question, just who is the mysterious ‘Woman in Black’? Southern Appalachia is filled…

    my people

    southernamericanwitches

    i’m sure y’all are probably following this blog already


    also let’s enjoy the lovely parallels between the Wee Folk in Ireland and the wee folk in the mountains where the Scots-Irish ended up.

    *happyflaps*

    This woman came through my community and created quite the controversy. My boss almost accidentally hit her as she was trying to cross the road.

  4. Reblogged from: mentalmentalhealth
  5. artofthedarkages:

    139r, Gospels, Cotton MS Nero D IV, British Library

    Reblogged from: heaveninawildflower
  6. intrepidcrow-girl:

    CORVOPHILIA

    [noun]

    a love of crows or ravens.

    [Jeremy Hush]

    Reblogged from: pinkiewitch
  7. holisticmedicine-animals-earth:

Lavender
Lavender is a very easy plant to grow. It adds a beautiful colour to your garden, has a wonderful scent after rain, and attracts bees and butterflies! As well as being a wonderful plant it also harbours many useful medicinal properties. Calming (anxiety and sleep troubles)
Rub some drops of Lavender essential oil onto cupped palms and inhale all the way into your amygdala gland (emotional warehouses of the brain) and rub oil onto hands and feet and just about anywhere on the body in order to calm the body and mind, (Ashley Turner, 2013). Add a few drops of Lavender essential oil to your pillow before bed to fall asleep faster. 
A small amount of lavender oil can be rubbed onto dogs with anxiety issues in order to calm them, (Nan Martin). This can be done in situations such as car travel anxiety, anxious trips to the vet, fear of storms, separation anxiety, meeting new people or pets, etc.Bee Stings
Add a drop of Lavender to an insect bite of bee sting once a day to reduce itching and swelling, (Valerie Ann Warwood, 1991). 
Minor Burns and Cuts
Put 2-3 drops of Lavender oil on a minor burn to decrease pain and to help treat the burn. “Lavender and aloe vera juice both promote new cell growth, reduce inflammation, stop infection, and decrease pain.” (Kathy Keville, Director of the American Herb Association).
Eczema and Dermatitis
"The oil’s antiseptic, antibacterial, and anti-fungal properties benefit mild cases of eczema (atopic dermatitis), as well as create a sense of stability for balanced skin. Lavender oil has been valued for hundreds of years as a natural remedy for skin conditions, as it brings circulation to skin cells that suffer from irritants and stress. It is especially rich in aromatic molecules called esters, which are antispasmodic, tonic, and pacifying. Its cicatrizant properties, which assist restoration through formation of scar tissue, help heal all kinds of wounds and burns. It is a powerful anti-inflammatory for the skin and was even used as an antibacterial in hospitals during World War I." (Nicole Kegan)
Many other uses
Dry skin, Chapped lips, Toothaches, Motion sickness, Cold Sores, Hay Fever, Acne, Aching Muscles, Menstrual Cramps, (http://www.netherfield.co.nz/reasons-use-lavender.php)ReferencesAshley Turner, ‘13 Uses For Lavender Oil: The Only Essential Oil You’ll Need’ 21st February, 2013. Mind Body Green http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-7769/13-uses-for-lavender-oil-the-only-essential-oil-youll-need.html
Nan Martin, LSHC, CRTS. ‘Dog Anxiety - Essential Oils Ease the Day!’ Experience-Essential-Oils.com, http://www.experience-essential-oils.com/dog-anxiety.html
Valerie Ann Warwood, ‘The Fragrant Pharmacy. A complete guide to aromatherapy and essential oils.’ 1990. 
Kathi Keville, Director of the American Herb Association, Editor of the American Herb Association Quarterly Newsletter, author of the book, Aromatherapy: The Complete Guide to the Healing Art and Pocket Guide to Aromatherapy, has written over 150 articles for such magazines as New Age Journal, The Herb Companion, and New Herbal Remedies. ‘How to Treat Burns with Aromatherapy, http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/natural-medicine/aromatherapy/how-to-treat-burns-with-aromatherapy.htm
Nicole Kegan, ‘Simple Lavender Oil Treatments for Eczema’. Wholesome One http://www.wholesomeone.com/article/simple-lavender-oil-treatments-eczema

    holisticmedicine-animals-earth:

    Lavender

    Lavender is a very easy plant to grow. It adds a beautiful colour to your garden, has a wonderful scent after rain, and attracts bees and butterflies! As well as being a wonderful plant it also harbours many useful medicinal properties. 

    Calming (anxiety and sleep troubles)

    Rub some drops of Lavender essential oil onto cupped palms and inhale all the way into your amygdala gland (emotional warehouses of the brain) and rub oil onto hands and feet and just about anywhere on the body in order to calm the body and mind, (Ashley Turner, 2013). Add a few drops of Lavender essential oil to your pillow before bed to fall asleep faster. 

    A small amount of lavender oil can be rubbed onto dogs with anxiety issues in order to calm them, (Nan Martin). This can be done in situations such as car travel anxiety, anxious trips to the vet, fear of storms, separation anxiety, meeting new people or pets, etc.

    Bee Stings

    Add a drop of Lavender to an insect bite of bee sting once a day to reduce itching and swelling, (Valerie Ann Warwood, 1991). 

    Minor Burns and Cuts

    Put 2-3 drops of Lavender oil on a minor burn to decrease pain and to help treat the burn. “Lavender and aloe vera juice both promote new cell growth, reduce inflammation, stop infection, and decrease pain.” (Kathy Keville, Director of the American Herb Association).

    Eczema and Dermatitis

    "The oil’s antiseptic, antibacterial, and anti-fungal properties benefit mild cases of eczema (atopic dermatitis), as well as create a sense of stability for balanced skin. Lavender oil has been valued for hundreds of years as a natural remedy for skin conditions, as it brings circulation to skin cells that suffer from irritants and stress. It is especially rich in aromatic molecules called esters, which are antispasmodic, tonic, and pacifying. Its cicatrizant properties, which assist restoration through formation of scar tissue, help heal all kinds of wounds and burns. It is a powerful anti-inflammatory for the skin and was even used as an antibacterial in hospitals during World War I." (Nicole Kegan)

    Many other uses

    Dry skin, Chapped lips, Toothaches, Motion sickness, Cold Sores, Hay Fever, Acne, Aching Muscles, Menstrual Cramps, (http://www.netherfield.co.nz/reasons-use-lavender.php)

    References
    Ashley Turner, ‘13 Uses For Lavender Oil: The Only Essential Oil You’ll Need’ 21st February, 2013. Mind Body Green http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-7769/13-uses-for-lavender-oil-the-only-essential-oil-youll-need.html

    Nan Martin, LSHC, CRTS. ‘Dog Anxiety - Essential Oils Ease the Day!’ Experience-Essential-Oils.com, http://www.experience-essential-oils.com/dog-anxiety.html

    Valerie Ann Warwood, ‘The Fragrant Pharmacy. A complete guide to aromatherapy and essential oils.’ 1990. 

    Kathi Keville, Director of the American Herb Association, Editor of the American Herb Association Quarterly Newsletter, author of the book, Aromatherapy: The Complete Guide to the Healing Art and Pocket Guide to Aromatherapy, has written over 150 articles for such magazines as New Age Journal, The Herb Companion, and New Herbal Remedies. ‘How to Treat Burns with Aromatherapy, http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/natural-medicine/aromatherapy/how-to-treat-burns-with-aromatherapy.htm

    Nicole Kegan, ‘Simple Lavender Oil Treatments for Eczema’. Wholesome One http://www.wholesomeone.com/article/simple-lavender-oil-treatments-eczema

    Reblogged from: lavenderandearlgrey
  8. heaveninawildflower:

 Passiflora Imperatrice Eugenie. Plate from ‘L’Illustration Horticole’ (1858) by Charles Antoine Lemaire. Published by  Gand, Belgium : Imprimerie et lithographie de F. et E. Gyselnyck,



Missouri Botanical Garden

 archive.org

    heaveninawildflower:

     Passiflora Imperatrice Eugenie. Plate from ‘L’Illustration Horticole’ (1858) by Charles Antoine Lemaire. Published by  Gand, Belgium : Imprimerie et lithographie de F. et E. Gyselnyck,

    Missouri Botanical Garden

     archive.org

    Reblogged from: heaveninawildflower
  9. Reblogged from: simply-beautiful-world
  10. djferreira224:

Bluebell wood by Angel Taylor .Hello friends on Flickr.
    Reblogged from: simply-beautiful-world
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